southbound and down

Last night, we had Southern Tier and southern collard greens. One of those serendipitous accidents I’m more than happy to blow out of proportion and exploit for the blog.

So. I’ve mentioned before that we get a small bin of assorted fruits and vegetables from our co-op every other Friday. (You can also shop the online store and add on other items like breads, meats, cheeses, jams, butters, you name it. And everything is local. It seriously rocks. Seriously.)

One of the other benefits is that it often forces us to get creative with some of the foods we’ve never cooked before– like collard greens, oyster mushrooms and live pea vines. (Yes, live pea vines, but that’s for another day.)

So last night, the hubs prepared some traditional southern collard greens and I made poached lemon peppercorn chicken and baked radish chips.

I had a funny observation about collard greens all ready for you, when I realized I was hijacking my own material from five months ago. I really need to get a life. Suffice it to say I still think it’s amusing that people boil salad and cook it in butter. But I’m not complaining. How could anything cooked in butter not taste good, right?

Anyway, the radish chips were awesome too — you just slice them and steam them in the microwave for a couple minutes then mix them with some chili powder, parika and garlic salt and bake them until they have the consistency of a chip. Even I can’t screw this up.

Now, how ’bout that beer.

There may not be anything I love more than a DIPA, except for maybe a solid Black IPA. (Note: The first one I ever loved was Bashah; with any luck, I’ll have a more in-depth discussion of Black IPAs for you tomorrow.)

Southern Tier Iniquity, 8.9% ABV (IBU unknown). They actually call this an imperial black ale. ST hails it as the “antithesis of Unearthly,” their imperial IPA, which I last imbibed this past Thanksgiving.

According to ST:

The hexagram talisman has been used around the world for centuries to invoke magic and good luck. The six–point star is also the customary symbol of the brewer, representing the essential aspects of purity: water, hops, grain, malt, yeast, and of course, the brewer. Wishes of good fortune often collaborate with the brewer’s creativity to yield dramatic results. We carefully chose the name for this Imperial India Black Ale, Iniquity – a word opposing goodness. Why? This beer is contrary to what one may expect from an IPA; this is an ale as black as night. It is the antithesis of Unearthly. Some may consider it an immoral act to blacken an ale. We suggest they don’t rely on conventional standards. Allow the darkness to consume you.

Word.

Running note: I still haven’t done any this week but I did manage to tear myself away from the sea salt brownies. Baby steps, people. I’m seeing a sports physician today about my shin and I’m hoping for some good news.

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “southbound and down

    • hey, sorry, somehow you ended up in my spam filter! I agree about the collard greens– last time, we just kind of quickly blanched them so they were still fluffy, less like canned spinach. 😉

  1. Good luck with the appointment- I’m hoping it’s only good things…

    My issue is I’m not that creative. I slowly introduce things in. So if I ended up with such a random stash of food, I’d probably have a nervous breakdown and call it a day with another pb sandwich. True story.

    Pea vines? What?

  2. I have totally attempted to plagiarize myself! I’ll get this really good idea and start a post about and then I’m like…wait, didn’t I already write about this? Back when I had, like, three readers? Boo.

    Radish chips huh? Interesting idea!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s